Tag Archives: War

Podcast #50: Can We Afford to Keep Ignoring the Cost of War?

War! What is it good for? And what does it cost? It seems that when countries go to war they consistantly lowball both the financial cost of the conflict, and also the loss of life. John Dale Grover, a Young Voices Advocate, wrote a piece in RealClearDefense that week on this very topic and joins the show today to discuss it.

You can follow John Dale Grover on Twitter @JohnDaleGrover , Stephen Kent @Stephen_Kent89 and Young Voices @YVADV

On Memorial Day, Let’s Remember the True Costs of War

Americans Must Claim Memorial Day as a Day to Promote Peace

Memorial Day often seems to bring about uneasy feelings among many Americans. People too often allow their anti-war views to manifest into disdain for U.S. troops. This shouldn’t be the case.

Memorial Day is an opportunity for Americans to honor the memory of American soldiers who have paid the ultimate sacrifice — a reminder of the true costs of war.

Memorial Day began as a Union holiday to honor the fallen soldiers of the Civil War and was eventually merged with Confederate remembrances to their Civil War dead. The joining of the north and south’s Memorial Day celebrations into a national remembrance for the fallen of all American wars was a critical step toward post-Civil War reconciliation between the north and south.

Today, Memorial Day can serve the same purpose. Americans must join together to honor the brave people who gave their lives in service of their country. But we must also take the next step by making the moral case of honoring the fallen through peace, rather than more war.

There have been 6,882 Americans killed in Iraq and Afghanistan over the past 15 years. This is more than a statistic. Every soldier who has died was a human being with parents, siblings, a spouse and possibly children. Every life lost through violent conflict prematurely cuts short the hopes and dreams these men and women, and their families, had for the future.

Memorial Day is an opportunity to honor the fallen, and to highlight the need to ensure that more Americans are not sent to perish in conflicts that do not advance our national interests.

Read the full article at the PanAm Post.

If Britain Can Debate Military Action, So Can the United States

The decision to go to war is the most consequential and serious choice a government ever has to make.

Recently, the United Kingdom’s House of Commons voted 397 to 223 in favor of bombing Syria, with the main purpose of combating the Islamic State (ISIS). More important than the decision is the fact that it was reached democratically, and that there was ample time for lawmakers to consider their position, with the debate lasting around 10 hours.

The United States should take note of this respect for the democratic process. Like Her Majesty’s Government, the US legislature should debate the pros and cons of military action, and not allow such a profound decision to be made by the president alone.

This is exactly what the Constitution intended. While there is legitimate debate about how to interpret other parts of our founding document, Article 1, Section 8 unquestionably gives the power to declare war to Congress.

Read the rest on the PanAm Post here.