Tag Archives: Trump

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Syria, North Korea, United passenger fiasco

Late last week, the Trump administration ordered a missile strike on Syria in retaliation for a chemical weapons attack on Syrian civilians. The political and diplomatic effects are still reverberating. Was this the right move?

Another potential crisis is brewing in northeast Asia. A U.S. carrier group is heading to the Sea of Japan as a show of force against recent North Korean aggression. Will this escalate the situation?

Perhaps the biggest story this week was the United Airlines passenger being dragged off a flight. Dr. David Dao was forcibly removed from a flight from Chicago to Louisville to make room for United crew members. How can this situation be avoided in the future?

Bill Buck of MyWallit.com, Jerrod Laber of Young Voices Advocates, conservative writer and editor Brian McNicoll discuss these issues & more….

Check out the whole exchange here

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The Freedom Caucus Vindicates the American System

Since the ignominious failure of the Obamacare repeal effort, President Trump has been lashing out at the Republican House Freedom Caucus on Twitter. “The Freedom Caucus will hurt the entire Republican agenda if they don’t get on the team, & fast,” he tweeted in a remarkable threat to members of his own party. President Trump’s frustration with legislative obstruction overlooks the fact that that obstruction is itself one of the greatest strengths of the American system of government.

The beauty of the American system is that it enables not only members of opposition or minority parties like today’s congressional Democrats, but also members of governing or majority parties, to curb executive power. What happened last month was an example of that phenomenon. Unlike the way things work in British-style parliamentary systems like that of my home country of Canada, with their fusion of the executive and legislative branches of government, Congress is elected separately from the president. Members of both chambers of Congress are accountable primarily to their constituents at the ballot box rather than to party leaders.

Republicans in the House were thus free to resist whatever pressure the Trump White House and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan exerted on them to vote for the American Health Care Act (AHCA). Contrary to the president’s incensed tweets, the AHCA went down to defeat not only thanks to the House Freedom Caucus, but also thanks to the so-called “Coverage Caucus” of more cautious Republicans who balked at the prospect of depriving millions of their constituents of health insurance. Freedom Caucus members and their allies refused to support the bill because it was not enough of a departure from the Affordable Care Act for them; “Coverage Caucus” Republicans opposed it because, in effect, it was too much of a departure from Obamacare.

Continue reading at The American Conservative 

Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates attends the first session of the NATO Defense Minister's meetings at the NATO headquarters in Brussels, Belgium March 10, 2011.  Defense Department photo by Cherie Cullen (released)

EU must find backbone to survive in Trump’s world

In a recent Atlantic interview, Henry Kissinger argued that above all, states and politicians around the world need to take the time to understand the implications of a Trump administration. He predicted that a “frenzy of studying” will now take place in an effort to formulate a response to this year’s election. The European Union (EU), however, cannot afford the luxury of a period of reflection.

Trump’s election has serious implications for European states and far too much is at stake for Europe to simply wish him well and hope for the best.

European states must pay attention to what Donald Trump has been saying about European affairs and be prepared to take the necessary precautions.

On the issue of European security, Trump is correct. Europe has developed a habit of relying on the US to make its tough foreign policy decisions.

Its external security has hitherto been guaranteed, but it has paid the price in internal friction, worsened by its inability to form a coherent foreign policy and effectively deal with the wave of refugees.

Now, European leaders must prepare for its worst-case scenario: a Russia-friendly, isolationist US willing to accept that Europe, to some extent, falls under the Kremlin’s sphere of influence.

Continue reading at EUobserver.

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Young Voices Podcast – The Two Faces of Viktor Orbán

Today’s Young Voices Podcast features Young Voices Executive Director Casey Given and YV Senior Advocate Máté Hajba on Hungary’s rising illiberal populism and its similarities to Trump’s proposed strongman policies.

The Young Voices donate page is now up and running, and be sure to follow Young Voices onFacebook and Twitter.

Don’t miss out on our future podcasts – subscribe on iTunes here!

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It’s time for Pennsylvania to switch to an open primary

The 2016 election cycle has been unlike any presidential election in history.

The excitement and drama of the election has been fun and alluring for some, but for others, this election cycle has become repulsive.

With the Republican and Democratic presidential nominations seemingly in the bag, many voters feel disenfranchised by their political parties.

It isn’t hard to find people who are eager to disassociate with their political party.

It isn’t hard to find people who are eager to disassociate with their political party.

Just ask a former Ted Cruz or Bernie Sanders supporter or look at #NeverTrump or #NeverHillary on twitter.

There are conservatives who feel that the Republican Party no longer represents their ideas and progressives who feel the same towards the Democratic Party.

People are actively rejecting party labels.

But when you look at the numbers prior to the Pennsylvania primary, it tells a slightly different story.

Read the full article at PennLive.