Tag Archives: Regulation

Podcast #78: 6-12 Years in Prison for an Amish Farmer

Last week in The Daily Beast, Jordan Reimschisel shared the story of an Amish farmer in Kentucky, sentenced to prison for producing and selling herbal skin cream without the government’s permission.

He joins us today on the podcast to tell how this happened and what comes next.

Follow Jordan on Twitte@JTReimschisel and Young Voices @YVADV and Stephen @Stephen_Kent89

Podcast #58: Let The People Have Their Rare Burgers

Today on the podcast, Olumayowa Okediran, a Young Voices Advocate based out of Nigeria.  Olumayowa wrote a piece in CapX titled “ Let us choose how rare our burgers are” and was kind enough to call into the podcast to talk abut it.

Follow Young Voices on Twitter @yvadv , Stephen @stephen_kent89 and Olumayowa @OokedIran 

Leave us a review on iTunes, Stitcher or GooglePlay where this podcast can be found and email [email protected] with your thoughts on the show.

Gifted Plans? What Ben Carson Could Mean For Housing Affordability

On March 2, after a month of unexpected delays, the Senate confirmed Ben Carson’s nomination to Secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development in a party-line 58-41 vote. The lightly contested vote followed unanimous confirmation in committee, as Senate Democrats signaled that Carson’s nomination simply isn’t the hill they are willing to die on. With Carson now in the driver’s seat at HUD, what in the world could the soft-spoken neurosurgeon mean for U.S. cities?

As many have pointed out, Carson’s hearing testimony was vague, and his background in housing policy is sparse. Yet in Carson’s prepared testimony and at recent events, he has consistently stressed the problem of housing affordability and the need for land-use liberalization at the local level. In this regard, Ben Carson joins a cross-ideological, bipartisan consensus ranging from the progressive left to the conservative right on the urgent need for land use reform and new development in America’s cities. While HUD’s power over local land use regulation and housing is limited, here are three low-cost reforms HUD could pursue under Carson.

First, Carson could direct HUD officials to craft and disseminate model zoning reform legislation to the states. As urban history geeks may know, conventional “Euclidian” zoning began in 1924, when a committee of planning proponents drafted the Standard Zoning Enabling Act. The act provided state policymakers with readymade zoning legislation, and within a decade, most states had adopted some form of the legislation, and thousands of cities had adopted zoning ordinances.

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