Tag Archives: Obamacare

Price’s Obamacare replacement would shift power to patients — which is why special interests will hate it

Donald Trump is serious about wresting control of our healthcare system away from the federal government and giving power back to patients, and he just showed it by naming Rep. Tom Price to head the Department of Health and Human Services.

Price is both an ardent opponent of Obamacare and an enthusiastic advocate for a more patient-centered healthcare system.

While virtually every Republican in Congress opposes Obamacare’s one-size-fits-all approach, Price has actually proposed detailed policy alternatives that make health insurance more affordable and accessible to patients.

Price’s plan, the Empowering Patients First Act, would improve American healthcare in three important ways. First, it would eliminate Obamacare’s provisions that increase the cost of health insurance. It would abolish the ACA’s “essential health benefits” — rules that force people to buy coverage for a range of expensive services they may not need or desire. These mandatory benefits include maternity care, newborn care, as well as pediatric vision and dental care, even if someone doesn’t have children.

Continue reading at Washington Examiner.

The Cadillac Tax Is a Poor Solution to a Real Problem

A presidential candidate wants to repeal part of the Affordable Care Act. Normally this would not be news, but the candidate in question is Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton, and the ACA provision is the Cadillac Tax, a levy on expensive employer-sponsored health insurance plans. The tax is deeply unpopular—it has been delayed to 2018—and with Democratic members of Congress under heavy pressure from labor unions who oppose the tax, itcould be repealed altogether. While the tax is certainly a poorly-designed policy, it does have a real purpose, and lawmakers should have an alternative solution ready before they repeal it.

The Cadillac Tax seeks to address the unlimited tax deduction for employer-sponsored health insurance. Since there is no comparable deduction for insurance purchased individually, employers have a massive incentive to provide their employees with insurance rather than letting them purchase it on their own. Currently, 90 percent of privately insured individuals get coverage through their employers.

The deduction is problematic for many reasons. Most obviously, it costs $250 billion per year—a figure subsidized by poorer individuals whose employers do not offer health insurance. It also encourages employers to give workers raises in the form of more-expensive health insurance plans rather than cash wages, since wages are taxable and health insurance is not. These employer-sponsored health insurance plans reduce competition through “insurance lock:” since employed individuals are disincentivized from shopping for their own health coverage, insurance companies are less likely to maintain both low prices and high quality. If you want a better plan, you might have to leave your job.

Read the full piece at Economics21.

Obamacare Is a Horror Story for Young Americans

Obamacare has enmeshed many Americans in a bureaucratic nightmare. True, the law has helped some uninsured people obtain coverage. But millions of people have seen their health-insurance plans canceled, because the plans did not meet the requirements of the Affordable Care Act. Others, particularly young Americans, have seen premiums rise to pay for the roster of newly added benefits.

Tommy Groves (not his real name), a young professional working at a small firm in Washington, D.C., was among the nearly 5 million Americans who received termination-of-coverage letters from their health-insurance providers because their plans did not comply with the ACA’s requirements. While about half the states offered to extend canceled plans for another year, later increased to two years, the District of Columbia required its residents to get new insurance.

Tommy had no choice but to grudgingly visit D.C. Health Link and attempt to sign up for an insurance plan on the ACA exchange. He did not get very far. Besides the embarrassing computer difficulties that became infamous on the state and federal exchanges, massive technological problems with “back-end functionality” also plagued the site. D.C. Health Link was unable to verify Tommy’s identity, and after hours of back-and-forth on the phone with an ACA help center, he was told to send in a paper application.

After many phone calls and countless hours on hold over a period of weeks, and despite multiple assurances to the contrary, Tommy was informed that his paper application had been lost. Finally he was directed to a place where he could sign up in person.

This attempt, too, did not succeed, as the “navigators” there had been instructed not to accept paper applications any longer. After he had spent hours more on the phone with D.C. Health Link over several additional weeks, the online system was finally able to verify his identity, and he met the deadline for purchasing health insurance. “I don’t want other people who are thrown off their employer’s health insurance to go through what I did,” Tommy told us.

“It was miserable and a complete waste of my time. Nobody listens to you. Nobody takes responsibility. The only advice I give people who are going to be stuck dealing with the health-care exchanges is, ‘Get ready for the bureaucracy.’”

Tommy’s premium for his “silver plan” went up to $225 a month from his $175 pre-ACA rate. Both plans cover the health-care services he wants, but his new plan includes services that he does not need, such as maternity care, pediatric dental care, mental-health coverage, and substance-abuse treatment. His deductible increased from $1,400 to $1,500 for in-network coverage, and from $2,800 to $3,000 for out-of-network coverage. Tommy is now paying more for coverage that is less valuable to him, and all after he was forced to spend dozens of hours on the phone.

Read the rest at National Review Online.