Tag Archives: Military

If Britain Can Debate Military Action, So Can the United States

The decision to go to war is the most consequential and serious choice a government ever has to make.

Recently, the United Kingdom’s House of Commons voted 397 to 223 in favor of bombing Syria, with the main purpose of combating the Islamic State (ISIS). More important than the decision is the fact that it was reached democratically, and that there was ample time for lawmakers to consider their position, with the debate lasting around 10 hours.

The United States should take note of this respect for the democratic process. Like Her Majesty’s Government, the US legislature should debate the pros and cons of military action, and not allow such a profound decision to be made by the president alone.

This is exactly what the Constitution intended. While there is legitimate debate about how to interpret other parts of our founding document, Article 1, Section 8 unquestionably gives the power to declare war to Congress.

Read the rest on the PanAm Post here.

Why the United States Should Withdraw from NATO

With the recent news that Turkey had downed a Russian warplane for supposed airspace violations, the international community has been in an uproar.

While the Russian and Turkish accounts of what exactly transpired are at odds, there is no doubt that the Turkish government shot down the Russian plane for what — by their own account — couldn’t have been more than a 17 second airspace violation.

Speculation abounds as to why Turkey did this, especially considering that Turkey has violated Greek airspace over 1,400 times this year alone. One possible idea is that this was in retaliation for Russian bombardment of Turkmen rebels who have ethnic ties to Turkey.

Whatever the case, the incident has prompted numerous people, including those who rarely pay attention to international politics, to pause in concern and contemplate the terrible disaster that this could provoke, if tensions spiral out of control. The worse case being a conflict between the United States and fellow nuclear armed state, Russia.

Read the rest on the PanAm Post here.

If You Really Want To Support the Troops Tell Them the Truth

With the recent passing of Veterans Day, social media, TV shows, and commercials were singing the praises of the brave men and women who defend America. Reading or listening to some of the praises heaped upon them, one would think that America would long ago have been overrun by barbaric hordes intent on enslaving and pillaging the entire country. Yet, such statements betray a lack of critical thinking on the part of those from whose lips such profuse praise pours forth.

When people thank soldiers for their service, does anyone stop and ask what the service being rendered is? Are the soldiers stopping hosts of invaders from sweeping in and destroying life as we know it? Are they repelling seaborne invaders making landfall on the East Coast? Clearly not.

Rather these soldiers are either on garrison duty domestically, deployed internationally to maintain the United States’ so-called strategic interests in places like Germany, Japan, Korea, Bahrain, and Italy, or they are fighting insurgencies in places like Iraq, Afghanistan, and Yemen, in order to spread American global hegemony.

Read the rest on AntiWar.com here.

Let the Kurds Mind Their Own Business So We Can Mind Ours

US interventionists may have good intentions, but it is extreme hubris to believe that our government can redraw the world map on a whim.

In his August 4 article for Rare, Tyler Koteskey highlights the Turkish government’s recent offensive against Kurdish militia groups, who have been our strongest allies in the fight against ISIS.

Unfortunately, Koteskey seems to buy wholesale into the idea that the United States should be the almighty arbiter of justice in the world. As a result, his analysis is off track.

Right from the beginning, the portrayal of the Kurds is incorrect. There is no doubt that as a whole the Kurds are friendly to the United States and have had a large amount of success fighting ISIS. But the Kurds are not a monolithic political entity.

Kurds, like almost every other group, have different ambitions and interests, which often conflict. In the 1990s, rival groups of Kurds fought a civil war. These divisions continue today, and affect their fight against ISIS. Unfortunately, because of the romanticized view journalists present of the region, there is little scrutiny and understanding of what goes on behind the facade of the potemkin village.

Read the rest on PanAm Post blog here.