Tag Archives: Economics

Dear NFL cheerleaders: Don’t sue your teams over low wages

Though the NFL season’s kickoff is still three months away, controversy already plagues the league. Most recently, NFL cheerleaders made the headlines with lawsuits over their low wages.

On Jan. 31, a former San Francisco 49ers cheerleader filed a class action suit against the NFL and 26 of its teams on behalf of all cheerleaders employed by the NFL for the past four years seeking $100 million to $300 million in damages. This cheerleader, called “Kelsey K.,” alleged that the NFL and member teams conspired to artificially suppress the wages of cheerleaders through collusion.

A federal judge dismissed this claim on May 26 at the request of the NFL and its member teams because he believed that the complaint did not present any evidence of collusion or antitrust behavior. Yet, because this lawsuit was just the latest in a string of allegations against the NFL of underpaying cheerleaders, it is important to make it clear that basic economics — not illegal collusion — is why cheerleaders choose to work for such low pay…

Read the rest at: The Washington Examiner

Hey, Buffalo Wild Wings and company: Don’t blame millennials for your dying restaurants

Calm down, Generation Xers –– millennials aren’t ruining casual dining, though Buffalo Wild Wings CEO Sally Smith would love to differ. Smith made headlines last week as she wrote about the casual dining demise in a letter to shareholders. She blamed declining sales on changing tastes, saying millennials prefer cooking at home, ordering food for delivery or frequenting restaurants that provide quick service. Although she’s certainly correct about reasons why casual dining has experienced a popularity decline, blame shouldn’t be placed on millennials –– it should be placed on the restaurants that have failed to keep up with changing demand.

Read more at The Washington Examiner

The Dangerous Effects of Far-Right Populism on Global Peace and Economics

Last week, a New York court charged white supremacist and army veteran, James Jackson, with second-degree murder for fatally stabbing a black man, Timothy Caughman, to death. Jackson later revealed that his frequent usage of neo-Nazi website, The Daily Stormer, informed his hate views confirming the violent rise in far-right activities.

Like other hate-fueled crimes committed in the last few months across Europe and the U.S., an unrestrained progression in far-right attitudes, especially those ignorantly propagated by political leaders, might trigger more racial intolerance, negatively affect economies and serve a victory for religious extremism and communist states.

Most of these violent opinions have reversed racial and religious tolerance, triggering attacks on minority groups, and, if unchecked, might brook more violence with threat on social diversity. It could also re-institutionalize racism, leaving a negative backdrop on the prolific tourist industry in Europe and the U.S. since one in ten enterprises in the non-financial business economy of European states are linked to tourism.

These over 2.2 million enterprises employ 12 million persons. In fact, Germany and France are top beneficiaries, with an average of over €38 billion in revenue between them. Likewise in the U.S., tourism supports over 7 million jobs and produces an economic output of over $1.6 million.

Continue reading at Outset Magazine