Tag Archives: Abortion

Podcast Ep #75: Hyperbole & pop-culture in politics

Managing Editor of Young Voices, Liz Wolfe, joins the podcast to share her thoughts on political use of The Handmaid’s Tale, as well as preview her upcoming piece on how non-profits are addressing homelessness with pod homes.

Follow Liz Wolfe @LizzyWol and Young Voices on Twitter @yvadv and Stephen Kent @stephen_kent89

Leave us a review on iTunes, Stitcher or GooglePlay where this podcast can be found and email [email protected] with your thoughts on the show.

 

Abortion protests that invoke ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ are ridiculous and, frankly, offensive

Last week, a group of female protesters dressed as handmaids from the popular show “The Handmaid’s Tale” ventured through the Ohio Statehouse in protest of Senate Bill 145, which would restrict abortion methods. Although protesting often involves hyperbole designed to make a point, this goes too far. Equating the abortion debate to a dystopian show where women are used as incubator slaves is intellectually dishonest––and, frankly, deeply offensive.

The bill they were protesting would ban dilation and evacuation procedures, which are exactly what they sound like––the cervix is dilated, and suction is used to get the fetus out. They’ve come under scrutiny in many states because they’re used when the fetus is more developed, so laws restricting them are fairly common.

Read more in The Washington Examiner

Wolfe: ‘Wrongful birth’ law is a wrongheaded way to curb abortions

Texas Senate Bill 25, currently being sent to the House, is a horrible policy rooted in good intentions. SB 25 prevents parents from suing their physician if their child is born with abnormalities or severe health conditions – even if those are discovered during the pregnancy and hidden from the parents.

As it is currently on the books, parents can file a “wrongful birth” claim against their doctor if they can make the case that they were not properly warned about severe health conditions. In legal terms, “wrongful birth” would no longer be a cause of action in malpractice suits.

The concept is clear: Given disproportionately-high abortion rates for fetuses with abnormalities and disabilities (such as Down Syndrome), some physicians and Texas legislators are attempting to curb that trend. If you simply hide medical knowledge about severe health conditions then parents are less likely to terminate the pregnancy, or so the thought goes.

Although these conditions – and subsequent lawsuits – occur rarely, it’s worth considering whether this will improve medical care or serve as a veiled measure to restrict and reduce abortion. I find it horribly sad to watch the Down Syndrome population decline rapidly as expectant parents choose abortion instead of raising a child with unique needs, but this bill isn’t the way to change that cultural problem.

Read the full piece at Houston Chronicle

The end of China’s one-child policy is more important than you think

As a child, I enjoyed reading the Shadow Children series of novels. The seven books describe a dystopian United States where it is illegal for families to have more than two children. If they do, the third child is executed by the government, along with their family and any accomplices.

Because the book was set in an unlikely future version of the U.S., I never thought such atrocities were possible in the real world. But similar atrocities have been taking place in China for the past 35 years.

Since the late 1970s, most pregnant Chinese women have been forced to have abortions if they already have one child. Women who aren’t complicit in the extermination of their fetuses are physically forced into it, backed by law. Sometimes they are forcibly sterilized.

Read the rest on the Washington Examiner here.