Gov. Brian Sandoval did the right thing by vetoing stricter green portfolio standards for utilities

Gov. Brian Sandoval’s recent decision to veto an increase in the state’s renewable portfolio standard is not just a win for the state’s economy, but for the environment, too.

Renewable portfolio standards require utilities to buy a percentage of the electricity they provide from qualifying sources such as wind and solar. It’s a policy that sounds straightforward, but it has several unintended consequences that work against its environmental goals.

Read more in the Las Vegas Review Journal

An EU Army Won’t Make Europe Safe

Growing distrust between Europe and the US government has led European governments to renew their commitment to building an autonomous and common defense policy. The idea of building a European military is as old as the idea of European integration itself. But in 1954, France refused to vote in favor of the European Defense Community project it initiated.

This is why the idea of European defense had been abandoned until 1992. The Treaty of Maastricht has created a “Common Foreign and Security Policy” to help Europe to build its own military. But this project is no longer necessary to keep Europe secure.

Read the rest at: Foundation for Economic Education

Podcast 76: Donald Trump & the anatomy of a media meltdown

Stephen Kent and Tim Joslyn pause from a busy Friday at Young Voices to discuss the crazy week for the media. CNN got it hard Tuesday with scandal and it was soon followed up with a Trump tweet that consumed the media’s attention for 2 days. We discuss how America got to this point, why the media loses even when they think they have the high ground and what July 4th means to us during a complicated time for America.

Follow Young Voices on Twitter at @YVADVStephen Kent @Stephen_Kent89

Leave the podcast a review and let us know what you think!

Michigan College Arrests Kids for Handing Out Constitutions, Whines About Being ‘Vilified’ When Students Sue

Young Americans for Liberty (YAL) members were passing out pocket-sized copies of the U.S. Constitution to fellow students at Kellogg Community College (KCC) in Michigan when college officials approached them and ordered them to stop. When the members refused—arguing that the First Amendment protected their actions—they were arrested for violating the school’s policies.

The charges were dropped 10 days later, but KCC students and YAL members Michelle Gregoire and Brandon Withers, along with the rest of the KCC YAL chapter, sued the community college, the Board of Trustees, and a few other administrators for violating their First Amendment rights, as Reason reported earlier this year.

Now the administration is claiming that they are the real victims and have been unfairly vilified by the YAL lawsuit.

Read the rest at: Reason

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