Young Voices is Changing How We Do Applications

Throughout our four-year history, Young Voices has accepted applicants to our Advocate Program on a rolling basis. While this has provided us with a steady pipeline of new talent, we want to make sure that each one of our writers is given the special attention needed to succeed as a rockstar communicator for liberty.

That’s why, moving forward, Young Voices will only be accepting new Advocates on a biannual basis. So, if you know a writer under 30 looking to jumpstart his or her career in liberty, please pass along this unique opportunity.

Applications for Young Voices’ fall 2017 Advocate class are now open for a limited time. Prospective Advocates should apply before September 8 for the chance to join the liberty movement’s premier collection of rising thought leaders.

On divorce, the Pope’s private communications don’t change church teachings

In questioning Francis on his ambiguity, the late Cardinal Joachim Meisner clarified the issue. With the Church divided over the proper interpretation of one of Pope Francis’s writings, some Catholics are cheering on the defense of orthodoxy by Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI. About two weeks ago, Cardinal Joachim Meisner died. He had been at odds with Francis this past year, over the Catholic doctrine against divorce. For Meisner’s funeral last weekend, Benedict sent a telegram praising the cardinal’s constant defense of the faith.
Read more in the National Review

How planners can liberate the next Amazon

There’s an archetypal American story that says a lot about who we are: an upstart entrepreneur, whether out of desperation or raw ambition, turns a great idea, elbow grease, and an empty garage into a thriving business. Like all mythologies, this story has its basis in reality.

While the humble home-based business holds enormous power in the American psyche, you wouldn’t know this by looking at any given city’s zoning ordinances. As we discover in a forthcoming paper for the American Planning Association’s Economic Development Division, many zoning ordinances continue to regulate home-based businesses to such an extent that entrepreneurs are practically required to keep their business under-the-table. This leaves many home-based businesses in the quasi-legal gray market, at the whim of code enforcers, unable to operate openly, scale up, and become the next Harley Davidson, Disney, or Yankee Candle.

Read more on Planetizen

Podcast Episode 77: Millennials Should Be Wary of Unions

Young Voices Advocate, Zachary Yost, calls in to the Young Voices Podcast to talk about millennials and unions. In response to a piece in the NYT calling for the younger generation to lead the labor movement, Yost wrote in the Examiner about the drawbacks of unionizing.

 

Follow Stephen @Stephen_Kent89 and Young Voices @YVADV

Leave us a review or rating on iTunes and consider APPLYING to be a Young Voices Advocate yourself at YoungVoicesAdvocates.com

Flying Dog Brewery terminates its Brewers Association membership in defense of free speech

Flying Dog Brewery terminated its membership with the Brewers Association over free speech concerns on June 1, marking the first time that a craft beer manufacturer split with the powerful trade group. The move was made in protest of a policy the Brewers Association announced in April aimed at cracking down on “sexually explicit, lewd, or demeaning brand names, language, text, graphics, photos, video, or other images.”

Flying Dog, who produces a popular Belgian IPA called Raging Bitch, is no stranger to censorship challenges. In 2009, the Michigan Liquor Control Commission barred the sale of Raging Bitch in the Wolverine State, claiming that the label is “detrimental to the public health, safety, and welfare.” Oddly enough, the label was designed by renowned artist Ralph Steadman, who is best known for illustrating many of Hunter S. Thompson’s best-known works, including Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.

Read more in the Washington Examiner

Photo by Bernt Rostad 

EU gun control punishes responsible gun owners

Despite considerable policy differences on the old continent, one issue almost entirely unites Europeans: gun control. This is currently reflected through legislators, who, despite the apparent ineffectiveness of current gun regulation, continue to infringe on the right to bear arms.

The EU Commission in Brussels agreed on stricter gun laws last December, with EU interior ministers deciding on new measures despite several members, including the Czechs, voting against it. The new directive institutes a complete ban on semi-automatic firearms, tightens regulations on online purchases, and allows for an exchange of information about gun owners across the continent.

Continue reading in TownHall